Curtis Wildfong

Business Development Manager Eric Icard, who comes from North Dakota with 13 years of experience and a master’s degree in economic development, has been designated the city of Greenville’s economic development manager by The Right Place. The city of Greenville reached an agreement with The Right Place for economic development in June. — Daily News/Curtis Wildfong

The Right Place officials discuss Greenville’s economic prospects

It was nearly a year after first discussing Montcalm County’s options for improving local economic development efforts before the city of Greenville opted to branch out on its own and sign an agreement with The Right Place. Less than three months later, the West Michigan economic development corporation delivered.

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Just A Dream Huntz helps out new hunters

With the echo of the shot still ringing through the trees and the rifle still firmly against his shoulder, 14-year-old Raymond Wyman couldn’t believe he’d missed.

It was his first chance to bag a buck, an 8-point he’d spotted from a blind early in the morning Saturday. Raymond, a Grattan resident, was out hunting with instructors of the Just A Dream Huntz program, put on for first-time and beginning hunters.

But even after the buck trotted of unfazed, it luckily wouldn’t be the last chance he had at his first deer.

The Greenville Garden Club is celebrating its 85th anniversary today. The group, shown here in a 2002 group photo, puts on monthly programs that focus on four main goals; home gardening, artistic floral design, conservation of the environment and civic beautification. It also maintains several gardens throughout the Greenville community and helps educate those interested in horticulture. — Courtesy photo

Greenville Garden Club marks 85 years of community beautification

When a seed is planted deep into the soil, it roots itself in before growing a stem and eventually blossoming into a living plant. Much like a sprouting plant, the Greenville Garden Club started as just a small pod.

Brothers Pat, left, and Chris Breimayer started their company Psycho Brew in 2010. Starting as hobby brewers, the two formed their company to build nano brewing systems for professional startup breweries. — Daily News/Curtis Wildfong

Brothers turn hobby into brewing production equipment business

It was 2008 and the United States was just entering the most dangerous economic crisis since the Great Depression. Chris Breimayer of Belding, an architectural designer in the midst of the housing market collapse, and his brother Pat Breimayer of Greenville, who worked for Delphi, which was going through bankruptcy, were looking for something new to do.

A large donation from Byron and Dee Cook to the Education Foundation of Greenville’s OUR3 Campaign brings the organization close to its $1 million fundraising goal. Pictured, from left, are Greenville School Board President and EFG Trustee Janet Ralph-Warnshuis, Byron and Dee Cook and EFG Chairwoman Carolyn Slocum. — Daily News/Curtis Wildfong

Education Foundation of Greenville nears $1 million goal

The Education Foundation of Greenville (EFG) launched an endowment campaign in 2009 to assure the funding of performance arts and advanced programs for Greenville students. The group set an initial fundraising goal of $1 million for the OUR3 Capital Campaign. Thanks to a donation from Byron and Dee Cook — the largest single gift the foundation has received — the organization is nearing that goal. The amount of the donation was not made public.

China-based Dicastal North America, Inc. announced today it has chosen Greenville over 35 other United States sites for its first aluminum wheel manufacturing plant outside of China. Greenville City Manager George Bosanic, center, discusses what the move means for the city. Also pictured are Dicastal Director of Business Development Dale Hadel, far left, and The Right Place CEO Birgit Kohls.

Aluminum wheel maker coming to Greenville, bringing 300 new jobs

China-based Dicastal North America Inc., the largest aluminum wheel manufacturer in the world, has reached an agreement with the city of Greenville to take over use of the former United Solar Ovanics (USO) buildings and bring 300 jobs to the area.

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Downtown Greenville facades will see facelifts

Working on behalf of downtown business owners, the city Tuesday accepted more than $200,000 in Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) which will be used to give two downtown buildings a facelift. The CDBG grants, which are awarded by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC), are for $203,100 and will be used for facade improvements to the buildings at 300 and 328 S. Lafayette St.

Barbara Drake

Drake was a dedicated community servant

Although Barbara Drake wasn’t born and raised in the Greenville community, you would never have guessed it by her dedication. With Drake’s passing last Thursday, the Greenville community lost a longtime supporter and public servant.

Robert Sherrick, who organized the Ray I. Booth American Legion Post 101 in Greenville’s weekly poker nights, sits in what now is a room full of empty poker tables. Regulations on charity poker rooms by the Michigan Gaming Control Board means the legion must cease hosting charity poker events, or at least profiting from them. — Daily News/Curtis Wildfong

Sweeping regulations shut down small-scale charity poker rooms

Last July, the Michigan Gaming Control Board (MGCB) issued a bevy of new regulations on charity poker rooms as the result of an investigation that found several large-scale operations were illegally diverting money away from charities.

About two dozen runners braved chilly temperatures Thursday to make the 5K trek through downtown Greenville and along the Fred Meijer Flat River Trail. Funds raised from the event go to Special Olympics Area 6, which covers Ionia and Montcalm counties. — Daily News/Curtis Wildfong

Law Enforcement Torch Run cheered on by Special Olympic athletes

With a brightly lit torch leading the way on a cold and cloudy Thursday, runners of the third Law Enforcement Community Torch Run made their way through downtown Greenville to help raise money for Special Olympics.

Law enforcement communities across the state of Michigan are organizing torch runs, which serve as one of multiple fundraisers law enforcement and Special Olympics have teamed up for.