Ryan Schlehuber “Scoop”

Daily News/Curtis Wildfong

The Greenville City Council approved the Planning Commission's recommendation to amend the language of downtown residency regulations, which would make it easier for upstairs rental units. Pictured, from left, are Mayor John Hoppough, Mayor Pro Tem Frances Schuleit and Councilman Mark Lehman. (Daily News | Curtis Wildfong)

City of Greenville agrees to language change in residency regulations

This city’s council approved the Planning Commission’s recommendation to amend the language of downtown residency regulations, which will make it easier for upstairs rental units.

Courtesy photos
From left, having noticed a spot forming on her nose in 2000, Stanton’s Cindy Partlo, at first, thought it was just a sunspot or freckle; laser surgery was used to remove the melanoma from Partlo’s nose and under her eye; Partlo is in the middle of recovering from melanoma cancer. — Courtesy photos

Stanton woman celebrates one-year recovery from cancer with Gran Fondo

It was just a sunspot. Perhaps a new freckle, so she told herself. But even after two dermatologists told Cindy Partlo it was not cancer, a small concern still lingered and grew, as did the spot over the years. Last spring, Partlo, 51, an administrative assistant at Mid-Michigan District Health Department, was strongly encouraged by her eye doctor, Renee Martin of Martin Eye Care in Greenville, to seek a third opinion for the spot on her nose, a spot she first noticed in 2000.

Two Carson City-Crystal graduating seniors had fun with the outlook of their future, decorating their graduation caps with the “To infinity and beyond” catchphrase from “Toy Story” character Buzz Lightyear during the class of 2014’s graduation ceremony Sunday. — Daily News/Ryan Schlehuber

CC-Crystal grads embodiment of confidence, success (Photo Gallery)

For many graduating seniors, there are memories, there are accomplishments and there are regrets. But, as senior Lindsay McClintic said during her speech at Carson City-Crystal’s graduation ceremony Sunday, there is no need for advice for her or her peers as they embark on life after high school. “From here on out, we will be facing many uncertainties in both the immediate and distant future,” McClintic said. “So when you think about it, uncertainty is just another word for opportunity.”

dnlogo

Funeral Notices for Saturday, May 24, 2014

Funeral notices for Saturday, May 24, 2014

dnlogo

Funeral Notices — Friday, May 9, 2014

Funeral notices for Friday, May 9, 2014

dnlogo

Funeral Notices – Saturday, April 26, 2014

Funeral notices for Saturday, April 26, 2014

This year is the 50th celebration of the Danish Festival in Greenville. Returning from a one-year hiatus are a fireworks display and the Tivoli Beer Garden, both which will be located at Klackle Orchard and Pavilion. The Danish Festival, themed "Little Red Shoes," is Aug. 14-17. See more information at danishfestival.org. (File photo)

Fireworks, Tivoli Beer Garden return for Danish Festival 50th celebration

It’s still a work in progress, but the planning of the 50th celebration of the community’s annual Danish Festival — set for Aug. 14-17 — is coming along nicely, according to event director Pam Jorae.

Family isn’t the only thing sisters (from left) Trisha Cole, Amanda Durst and Malorie Newman have in common. All three Cedar Springs High School graduates serve in the National Guard. Cole, who enlisted in 2008, is a sergenat with Echo Company 3-238 Aviation Battalion in Grand Ledge; Durst, who enlisted in 2003, is a sergeant for the 1073rd National Guard Maintenance Divison in Greenville; and Newman, who enlisted in 2009, is a second lieutenant for the 182nd Field Artillery Battalion in Detroit.

S.H.E.: Sisters finds purpose in life, unique bond through National Guard service

Their individual stories are worth ink all by themselves, however, the bond that sisters Amanda Durst, Trisha Cole and Malorie Newman share beyond their family ties is unique in itself.

The family team of, from left, Layla McKenzie, 7, Jamie McKenzie, Aidan Porta, 8, and Chris Bartosiewicz, all of Greenville, did the Turk Lake Polar Plunge on Saturday in honor of their relative, the late Bradley Rappuhn, a specialist in the U.S. Army, who died while serving in Afghanistan three years ago. (Daily News/Ryan Schlehuber)

Turk Lake Polar Plunge raises $55,000+ for Special Olympics

Of the 173 participants jumping into the cold water for the annual Polar Plunge fundraiser for Montcalm County Special Olympians on Saturday, there was none who epitomized the bravery and commitment more than 7-year-old Layla McKenzie of Greenville.

Members of the Ionia Area Emergency Response Team perform a mock cell rush of a prisoner during last year’s Polar Plunge at Clifford Lake. This year’s event is outside of the Turk Lake Bar on Saturday, Feb. 8. Plunging begins at 3 p.m. All are welcome to jump in or just enjoy the show. More than 100 people have already signed up to take the plunge. — Courtesy photo

Freezing for funds: Turk Lake is new location for Polar Plunge

Jim Dennis is overwhelmed. He is surrounded by insane people. And he’s loving it. Flooded with emails, phone calls and Facebook comments, Dennis, coordinator of the annual Polar Plunge fundraiser event for Montcalm County, is once again gathering pledges from brave souls who will “take the plunge” into the cold waters of Turk Lake to raise funds for local Special Olympics athletes.