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A group of fifth-graders examine the “organs” of an artificial human torso during the a mini medical school event at Baldwin Heights Elementary School. Surgeons from Spectrum United Health Hospital instructed students on a variety of surgeries. — Daily News/Curtis Wildfong

Greenville elementary school students enjoy hands-on medical experience

Scalpel, please. Donning full surgeon gear, fifth-grade students at Baldwin Heights and Lincoln Heights elementary in Greenville got a first-person point of view of what it’s like to operate on different organs within the human torso.

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Greenville firefighters, officers prepare for emergencies with ice rescue training

The majority of local lakes, rivers and streams may be safely frozen over for the time being, but in a matter of weeks, the current frozen tundra that is Michigan will began to thaw, creating dangerous situations for those who continue to venture onto the ice. That’s why members of the Greenville Department of Public Safety took time Thursday afternoon to partake in an ice rescue training session on Baldwin Lake, to remain proficient in their skills before the dangers of thawing ice occur.

The Grattan Academy Board of Directors responded Monday to a student achievement study conducted by The Center for Michigan and published in Bridge Magazine, which ranked the district last in the state. Officials questioned some of the data used in the report, but at the same time stated the district needed to do a better job for students. Pictured, from left, are Board President Beth Ryan, Secretary Kim Ricards, Treasurer Aarron Antclif and Superintendent Tom Kreiner. — Daily News/Curtis Wildfong

Grattan Academy officials question report, but say it shouldn’t be ignored

Despite questioning some of the theory behind it, it’s hard for Grattan Academy to ignore the recent Academic State Champs report that named it the worst school in the state. In spite of the questions, and in light of the data, there was one common theme among the Grattan Academy Board of Directors at Monday night’s school board meeting … “we must do better.”

Grattan Academy Superintendent Tom Kreiner talks with students during a break between classes in the school cafeteria Tuesday morning. — Daily News/Cory Smith

Grattan Academy officials disagree with Academic State Champs report

Tom Kreiner will be the first person to admit Grattan Academy isn’t perfect. But the worst school in the state of Michigan? That unhappy distinction is according to the third annual Academic State Champs report from Bridge Magazine and The Center for Michigan. The report ranks Michigan’s schools from best to worst, based on a combination of test scores and income levels of families.

The Greenville City Council on Monday approved transferring more than $250,000 between multiple accounts to cover some funds which were operating on a deficit. The city moved money from the balances of healthy funds to those considered deficit funds in order to balance them, something that is required by state law. Pictured, from left, are City Manager George Bosanic, Mayor John Hoppough and Mayor Pro Tem Frances Schuleit. — Daily News/Curtis Wildfong

Greenville moves money to comply with state law

The Greenville City Council on Monday approved transferring more than $250,000 between multiple accounts to cover some funds which were operating on a deficit. The city moved money from the balances of healthy funds to those considered deficit funds in order to balance them, something that is required by state law.

Baldwin Heights Elementary Parent Teacher Organization President Ann Harvey has helped make the school’s organization stronger than it ever has been before. With a lot of time and effort, the school’s PTO has seen its budget go from $8,000 to $22,000 in less than three years. — Daily News/Curtis Wildfong

Baldwin Heights’ passionate PTO leader spurs fundraising efforts

What started as an effort to get more involved in her daughter’s school has morphed into a full-time passion for Ann Harvey, president of the Baldwin Heights Elementary Parent Teacher Organization.

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Holocaust survivor shares his journey with Greenville audience

The most chilling thing was Martin Lowenberg’s matter of fact tone as he recounted his personal history, a tale of unspeakable hardship, degradation and loss Yes, it has been over 75 years since Lowenberg — then a child of 8 — was pulled from his home, along with his parents, sister and twin brothers and taken by German soldiers to a Jewish ghetto, then later to a series of concentration camps. When he was finally liberated nine years later, he was 17 years old and weighed 76 pounds.

The Greater Greenville Transportation Committee began its 2014 campaign rehashing some of its short-term and long-term goals, trying to focus its efforts back to its core goals. Committee members said because of declining membership the committee would shift its goals to those it can impact the most. — Daily News/Curtis Wildfong

Greenville transportation committee sets goals for 2014

The Greater Greenville Transportation Committee began its 2014 campaign by rehashing some of its short-term and long-term goals, trying to focus its efforts back to its core goals. Although attendance at Wednesday’s meeting, which occurs once a quarter, was higher than it has been in the past, committee members said because of declining membership the committee would shift its goals to those it can impact the most.

John Vogl, 42, of Greenville, is charged with operating or maintaining a meth lab in Greenville. — Daily News/Elisabeth Waldon

Greenville meth lab suspects face felony charges

Two “broke” individuals were arraigned Tuesday afternoon for their alleged roles in a methamphetamine laboratory and standoff with multiple police agencies Sunday. John Vogl II, 42, of Greenville, and Cassaundra Kidder, 22, of Wayland, are each charged with operating or maintaining a lab involving meth, a felony with a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison and/or a $25,000 fine.

Students, from left, Xavier Stanford, Madi Durdle and Jacon Guild dissect one of the many pig lungs on display for Baldwin Heights Elementary fifth graders Monday. — Daily News/Curtis Wildfong

Baldwin Heights students get hands-on experience with dissection exercise

It doesn’t get any more hands-on than a student with a pair of surgical gloves, a scalpel and a pig lung. As part of their study of the human body and its organs, fifth-graders at Baldwin Heights Elementary School in Greenville dissected pig lungs and hearts Monday afternoon to get a glimpse at something similar to their own organs.