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No Danish Festival is complete without the dedicated help of Linda and Joel VanHouten, this year’s grand marshals. The VanHoutens, pictured with their dog, Chance, have been deeply involved in the annual festival each year, especially with fine arts. — Daily News/ Ryan Schlehuber

Danish Festival grand marshals’ legacy lies within fine arts

For Linda and Joel VanHouten, this year’s Danish Festival was going to be a little different. However, it became a lot more special than the couple was expecting. Each year, the Greenville couple are highly involved in the annual event, which is celebrating its 51st year. From helping coordinate the festival’s many musical programs, such as the concert series, teen dance and the downtown stage performances, to holding luncheons for the Danish queen and her court, to volunteering pretty much wherever they can, the VanHoutens always look forward to dedicating their time to Greenville’s biggest summer event.

Greenville High School Class of 2015 students move their tassels to the appropriate position of graduates. — Daily News/Brad Klosner

Greenville High School graduates 249 during Sunday’s ceremony

When it comes to high school graduation, no one said it better than Greenville High School graduate Tate Jeffrey. “It was a long time in the coming,” he said. “I’m ready to be done. It feels great.”

During Tuesday’s Greenville Planning Commission meeting, Land and Resource Engineering Inc. President Todd Olin discusses a new site plan for the construction project of the EZ Mart Mobil gas station located at the corner of Clay and Washington streets. — Daily News/Brad Klosner

Greenville reviews EZ Mart site expansion

Venturing into unknown waters can be trying for even the most stouthearted. But, as they say, fortune favors the bold.

U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development Area Specialist Aileen Waldron, at right, discusses grant and loan opportunities during Tuesday’s Greenville DDA meeting, while Michigan Economic Development Corp. Community Assistance Specialist Ryan Kilpatrick listens. At top right, Kilpatrick discusses facade grants for Greenville and Montcalm County. — Daily News/Brad Klosner

Greenville DDA learns about financial assistance opportunities

Renovating a building, whether business or residential needs, can be costly. However, there are a multitude of programs that can offer grants and low-interest loans to ease the financial burden on property owners looking to spruce up their buildings.

Greenville High School shop teacher Adam Hopkins and Bruce Aittama stand in their shop with some of their students’ wood work: A set of bows and a finely crafted chair. — Daily News/Brad Klosner

Greenville students get 72 awards at industrial arts competition

When it comes to showing off industrial technological skills, the students of the industrial arts programs at Greenville Public Schools are some of the best. Last Friday, students from the shop classes at Greenville High School and Greenville Middle School entered 84 projects into the Michigan Industrial Technology Education Society (MITES) regional competition. Joining more than 800 other entries at Coopersville High School, the Greenville students did exceptionally well in seven categories, including wood working, metal working, computer-aided design (CAD), welding and machining.

Approximately 24 community members joined the Greenville Public Schools Community Strategic Planning Session 1 on Thursday to give input into the “core values” the community expects out of the school district. — Daily News/Brad Klosner

Greenville schools host parents for strategic planning

The old African proverb states: It takes a village to raise a child. When it comes down to coming together as a community to raise their children, parents in Greenville take it seriously.

On Monday, workers on Oak Street were removing a tree from the side of the street as a part of a road repairs and water main replacement project. — Daily News/Brad Klosner

Summer-long project closes 2 Greenville streets

When it comes to identifying when the cold has finally officially fled for the year, Michiganders know the tell-tale sign better than anyone in the nation: Road construction. Greenville residents who have been traveling down Baldwin or Oak streets know that construction season has finally began. A portion of both streets have been torn up in the past week as part of a road construction project which will continue for the remainder of the summer.

Greenville City Councilman Lloyd Scoby and City Manager George Bosanic joined in a discussion on the merits and pitfalls of Proposal 1 during the Greenville City Council meeting on Tuesday. — Daily News/Brad Klosner

Greenville city officials weigh in on Proposal 1

As the deadline for understanding Proposal 1 creeps closer, more and more institutions are discussing the matter in an effort to understand both the merits and pitfalls of the ballot proposal. During Tuesday’s meeting, the Greenville City Council weighed in on the impacts of Michigan Ballot Proposal 15-1, or simply Proposal 1, which will go before voters on May 5.

The Star-Wars themed Run-2-Bike-2 (R2B2) Duathlon event will take place from 6:30 to 8 p.m. May 4 at the Greenville Community Center. — Courtesy/Tri-Greenville Committee

R2B2 Duathlon features Jedis and Siths, helps food pantries

A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away there was an event which brought peace. That event was the R2B2 Duathlon.

A Montcalm County resident asks a question during an informational forum on Monday at the Greenville High School Performing Arts Center. — Daily News/Brad Klosner

Proposal 1 forum tries to shed light on May 5 decision

Although May 5 is less than two weeks away, voters who plan on weighing in on Proposal 1 may need all of that time to become completely aware of all the implications in the statewide ballot proposal. Pennies to dollars, there will be some questions voters have on the complicated language of the proposal after giving it a thorough read.