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Funeral Notices for April 12, 2016

Read The Daily News Funeral Notices for Tuesday, April 12, 2016

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IN BRIEF: Greenville to restructure professional development days

Greenville Public Schools is changing the way they approach professional development days.

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IN BRIEF: Unused CC-C bond funds to be reallocated for additional building enhancements

Additional enhancements are coming to Carson City-Crystal Schools thanks to quick work by construction workers.

Members of the  Montcalm Community College Philharmonic Orchestra, Alumni and Friends Choir, Greenville High School Orchestra and Flat River Dance Company perform during a rehearsal for the upcoming "Carmina Burana" concert at Greenville High School. — Daily News/Cory Smith

Area artists coming together for ‘Carmina Burana’ (PHOTOS)

On Sunday, April 17, the Greenville Performing Arts Center will house a concert unlike anything attempted within its venue before. Performed by more than 150 area artists, from musicians to vocalists and talented dancers, “Carmina Burana,” a composition of 24 poems set to music, will feature powerful rhythms, unforgettable vocals and flowing dance routines.

Lakeview's Kirsten Johnson will play college softball for Olivet College next year.

Lakeview’s Johnson heads to Olivet in 2017

Kirsten Johnson will be playing softball beyond this spring. Johnson signed a letter of intent to play for Olivet College in the spring of 2017. Johnson had been recruited by Lansing Community College, Alma College, Muskegon Community College and Aquinas College.

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Six local girls basketball teams academic all-state

Academics is a topic that is stressed in the athletic programs of local high schools, and the Basketball Coaches Association of Michigan (BCAM) noticed. BCAM announced its academic all-state girls basketball teams Thursday, with six of the eight local schools being named honorable mention in their classes. The top 10 in team GPA were named academic all-state, with all others who had at least a 3.0 team GPA named honorable mention.

Greenville’s Kyle Smith, second from right, signs his letter of intent to play for DePaul University Feb. 3. Joining Kyle in the photo are, from left, his father, Dan Smith, mother, Mari Smith, and Alliance Academy Soccer Club coach Ryan Fitzsimmons. - Courtesy Photo

Greenville’s Kyle Smith heading to DePaul

One local high school student-athlete is going to play soccer in college. Kyle Smith, who spent two seasons as a goalkeeper with Greenville, signed a letter of intent to play soccer for Division 1 DePaul University. Smith played for the Yellow Jackets as a freshman and a senior. The senior spent the two seasons as a sophomore and a junior with the Alliance Academy Football Club soccer program.

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West Michigan falls 5-3 in frigid home opener

What a difference a change of venue and better weather conditions can make. The West Michigan Whitecaps went from blowing snow in South Bend, Ind., — where they won two games — to a sunny, but cold day Saturday where they lost to the South Bend Cubs 5-3 in the Whitecaps’ home opener. The game-time temperature for the home opener was 35 degrees, which was the second-coldest home opener in Whitecaps’ history. It was 34 degrees in 2003.

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Funeral Notices for April 11, 2016

Read The Daily News Funeral Notices for Monday, April 11, 2016

“Benjamin Losford and His Handy Dandy Clippers” tells the true story of a freed slave and his journey from a Kentucky plantation to the village of Edmore, where he became the town’s barber and a respected member of the community. (Courtesy illustration)

New children’s book highlights local contributions of African Americans

Benjamin Losford was born into a life of slavery. It was the mid-1800s, a plantation in Boone County, Ky. Growing up, Benjamin would overhear relatives speaking in hushed voices of his father, Abraham, who has escaped to the north, vowing to someday return for his family. Abraham’s first attempt to reclaim Benjamin and his sister resulted in his recapture.

But Abraham — who had served as the plantation’s resident barber — escaped a second time, eventually settling in Howell, where he opened his own barber shop