The entire Battle family gathered Wednesday morning in Montcalm County Probate Court to make their adoption of two toddlers, Kaylee and Jameson, official. Pictured are, from left, Kelsey, Troy, Alexis, Kaylee, Philip, Barbara and Jameson Battle, and Judge Charles Simon III, who presided over the procedure. — Daily News/Mike Taylor

Howard City family has two new reasons to be thankful this year

Typically, judges take a dim view of participants in courtroom proceedings running up and down the aisles while emitting ear-piercing screams at the top of their lungs. But last Wednesday, Montcalm County Probate Judge Charles Simon III made an exception to this rule.

Howard City Department of Public Works Director Mike VanWagner writes job assignments on a whiteboard in the DPW office. — Daily News/Elisabeth Waldon

Howard City Village Council voices multiple complaints about DPW

A report about a water leak turned into a litany of complaints about the Department of Public Works at Monday’s Howard City Village Council meeting. The council received a written report from DPW Director Mike VanWagner — who was not in attendance at the meeting — about a water leak the DPW has been investigating since last spring.

Howard City Village Manager Randy Heckman thinks this tract of land situated between Leppink’s and Mercantile Bank on Shaw Street would be a good location for a drive-through restaurant. — Daily News/Elisabeth Waldon

Fast food dreams: Howard City hoping for drive-through restaurant

It’s no secret Howard City residents long for the convenience of a local fast food restaurant. Talks about bringing McDonald’s or a similar drive-through to town have come and gone without results over the years.

Wolverine World Wide’s distribution center in Howard City opened in 1998 and encompasses 490,000 square feet. — Daily News/Elisabeth Waldon

Made in Our Own Backyard: Wolverine World Wide (PHOTO GALLERY)

Wolverine World Wide has always kept Ted Barr busy. The Howard City man began working with the footwear and apparel company in the mid-1980s. He began at the Big Rapids factory, then moved to the Rockford factory where he worked in a supervisory capacity and made frequent trips to the company’s factory in Arkansas.

Harvest Festival

13th annual Harvest Festival returning to Howard City

Howard City’s annual celebration of autumn will return once again with events old and new. The 13th annual Howard City Harvest Festival will take place all day Saturday in downtown Howard City.

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Pierson Township home destroyed in fire, along with three dogs

Staring in disbelief, Matt Bierema watched helplessly Thursday afternoon as firefighters worked to extinguish a blaze that was engulfing his home. As the reality of the situation set in, the structure now a total loss, he could only bury his face into his folded arms atop a nearby parked car.

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Car plows through Pierson cemetery, destroys headstones

A Howard City man allegedly drove his car through this township’s cemetery this afternoon, leaving a path of destruction in his wake. Montcalm County Sheriff’s deputies responded to the cemetery at the intersection of Amy School and Cannonsville Road around 3:30 p.m. today.

A letter from the IRS to Pierson Township details how the township is being financially penalized to the tune of at least $35,849.83 due to the “intentional disregard” of former clerk Brooke Scott. — Daily News/Elisabeth Waldon

Former Pierson Township clerk costs taxpayers tens of thousands of dollars

Five years of ignoring the IRS is costing the taxpayers of this small township tens of thousands of dollars … and counting. So far, Pierson Township has paid $35,849.83 in back pay, interest and penalties due to the negligence of former township clerk Brooke Scott, who failed to file multiple IRS forms from 2008 to 2013, when she resigned. She also misappropriated expenditures and mishandled the township’s payroll.

Jim Kersjes of Grand Rapids, a volunteer with the Muskegon River Watershed Assembly, prepares to help kayakers portage around fallen trees in the Tamarack Creek. — Daily News/Elisabeth Waldon

Traversing the Tamarack: Behind the scenes with a backyard treasure

A group representing the Muskegon River Watershed Assembly recently kayaked down a local tributary, and I went along for the ride. A banner boasting the epic title “Voyage of Discovery” was on display last Friday morning at Minnie Farmer Park on the east side of Howard City. The voyage covered about three miles of the Tamarack Creek from Minnie Farmer Park’s artesian well to Artman Park on Howard City’s west side.

This white bridge is a popular draw for photographs and weddings at Artman Park, located on the Tamarack Creek just west of Howard City. The Muskegon River Watershed Assembly has a project underway to stabilize the park’s streambanks, which have been eroding. — Daily News/Elisabeth Waldon

Muskegon River Watershed projects in the works for Montcalm County

The Muskegon River travels through 12 counties in Michigan, playing a major role in the Great Lakes State moniker. A group of river-lovers have been working for almost two decades with the mission to preserve, protect and restore the Muskegon River Watershed, which encompasses more than 2,700 miles in west central Michigan.