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Paulina (Hurt) Lawton

Central Montcalm High School friends come together years later to help

Growing up in a small town, ties are made that last a lifetime, ties that transcend time and distance and remain strong over countless years and miles. So it is for Paulina (Hurt) Lawton and Danise Garbow, both of whom graduated from Central Montcalm High School more years ago than either woman cares to admit publicly.

On shifts of 12 hours at a time, the highly experienced dispatchers of the Montcalm County Central Dispatch in Stanton take multitasking to the extreme with their daily duties. Dispatcher Karisa Bailey sits in front of the long line of computer screens she oversees as calls come into the 911 center. Each screen has a different program and serves a different purpose. — Daily News/Curtis Wildfong

Dispatchers team up to guide callers through dire circumstances

Illuminated by the bluish glow of a computer screen, the sharp eyes of 30-year veteran dispatcher Jan Jourdan dart from one monitor to the next, locating nearest personnel, directing services and gathering information from the caller, all while keeping an almost eery calm.

Sharilee “Charli” Sprowls, seen here with her husband, Simon, at last summer’s Wheatland Music Festival in Remus, is hoping a groundbreaking surgical procedure will be able to remove the pineal cyst that has caused her  to experience terrible headaches for the past seven years. — Courtesy photo

Stanton woman raising funds for her own brain tumor surgery

Sharilee Sprowls, “Charli,” to her friends, is hoping an upcoming surgery will end the debilitating headaches that have plagued her daily for the past seven years. More than just headaches, really, the painful attacks are so severe that all Charli can do when she’s having one is remain in a darkened bedroom; any other activity makes the pain unbearable.

More than two dozen people attended Monday's Montcalm County Board of Commissioners meeting, which included a public hearing about a proposed property tax increase to fund the Montcalm Alliance. — Daily News/Cory Smith

County commissioners decline to vote on Montcalm Alliance millage

Many people have voiced opinions about a proposed economic development millage, but in the end it was silence that made the decision. After a 39-minute public hearing Monday afternoon, the Montcalm County Board of Commissioners declined to vote on a property tax increase to fund the Montcalm Alliance using Michigan’s Public Act 88, which would bypass a vote of the people.

William Tingley, owner of Tingley & Associates in Stanton, does contracted remonumentation work for Gratiot and Montcalm counties. Here he looks at the tag of an ancient shot gun, which was once used as a survey marker at an Evergreen Township location. — Daily News/Elisabeth Waldon

Montcalm County remonumentation project 60 percent complete

Twenty years ago, a major surveying project got underway in Montcalm County. The Montcalm Remonumentation Program was part of a statewide effort starting in 1993 with the goal of preserving history, protecting cadastral surveys (maps showing boundaries or property lines) and promoting professional surveying practices, according to William Tingley of Tingley & Associates, a land surveying and engineering service in Stanton. Tingley has a contract for the remonumentation of Gratiot and Montcalm counties.

Audience members applaud a comment spoken out against a proposed Montcalm Alliance millage Monday afternoon. — Daily News/Cory Smith

Montcalm Alliance millage request heads to public hearing

With apologies to Malcolm Rebennack Jr., better known as Dr. John, members of the Montcalm Alliance were “in The Right Place … but it must have been the wrong time …” The Montcalm County Board of Commissioners didn’t vote for or against a millage request from the Montcalm Alliance on Monday, deciding instead to send the proposal to a public hearing next month.

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Sheridan Village Council discusses problems created by flushing wipes

Members of the Sheridan Village Council dealt with a full agenda at its regular meeting Tuesday evening, but no topic engaged the council more than the things residents are flushing down their toilets. According to Village Superintendent Doug Lane, the thousands of disposable baby wipes being flushed into the village’s sewer system every week is starting to cost the village real money in terms of manpower, clogged pipes and even burned out water pumps.

Reagan Johnson, 3, of Stanton, talks to Santa Claus. Not only did she share what she would like to receive, but she also asked Santa what he would like for Christmas. — Courtesy photo

MCC’s Heritage Village Holiday offered guest old-fashioned Christmas-themed events

Light snowflakes were fluttering down as groups of carolers, donned in Victorian garb, sang Christmas songs to those strolling past. The scene was not only one from a Charles Dickens novel, but also one at the Montcalm Community College’s Heritage Village, the locale of the Heritage Village Holiday on Sunday afternoon. Formerly known as Santa’s Super Sunday, the 32nd annual event draws in hundreds of residents from all around Montcalm County.

James Freed, center, speaks out against a millage proposed by the Montcalm Alliance while the Montcalm County Board of Commissioners, at left, and Montcalm Alliance members, at right, listen. — Daily News/Elisabeth Waldon

Montcalm Alliance millage request to bypass Montcalm County voters

The Montcalm Alliance’s request for a countywide millage to fund economic development efforts will be voted on without local voters or a ballot. Montcalm Alliance members previously presented an overview of their millage request to the Montcalm County Board of Commissioners on Nov. 12. At that meeting, Montcalm Alliance members said they wanted to pursue voter approval of .1 mills to generate $162,000 to allow the Montcalm Alliance to join forces with The Right Place, a West Michigan business development and economic development agency which offers services to support existing and new businesses.

Practice manager and certified veterinary assistant Brandy Taft, above, says Sheridan Animal Hospital will be ready to accommodate both large and small animal patients within the next two weeks. Meanwhile, veterinarian Sherry Teegardin will continue operating as a mobile vet. — Daily News/Mike Taylor

Sheridan Animal Hospital set to care for ‘all creatures great and small’

This week, Dr. Sherry Teegardin will realize the culmination of a dream nearly five years in the making when she officially opens the doors to Sheridan Animal Hospital. From noon to 5 p.m. Friday, the new veterinary clinic will host an open house to introduce area animal lovers to the facility’s many amenities.